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William E. Seaman, M.D.

William Seaman, M.D.Professor, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology
Research Director, American Asthma Foundation Executive Committee Member, Sandler Asthma Basic Research Center

University of California, San Francisco
Box 0509
4150 Clement Street
VAMC 111R
San Francisco, CA 94121

Tel: (415) 750-2104
Fax: (415) 750-6920

Email: bseaman@medicine.ucsf.edu

Websites:
The Cancer Center
Immunology Graduate Program
American Asthma Foundation

Dr. Seaman received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1969. He completed his medical residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Arthritis and Rheumatism Branch of the NIAMDD/NIH. In 1976, he joined the faculty of the Department of Medicine at UCSF, where he served as Chief of the Arthritis/Immunology Section at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (1981-92) and as Chief of the Medical Service at San Francisco VA Medical Center (1992-99).

The Seaman laboratory is interested in the cell surface receptors that either activate or inhibit leukocytes that are involved in the regulation of immunity and autoimmunity. These cells include T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Of particular interest to the laboratory are families of receptors on these cells that are related in structure but that deliver opposing signals for cell activation and function. Recent studies have focused in particular on TREM2, a receptor that the laboratory first cloned in mice. The laboratory has recently shown that TREM2 on macrophages and/or on microglia serves as a phagocytic receptor for bacteria and for apoptotic cells.

Additionally, the laboratory has been studying an immunoglobulin-like receptor on activated B cells called TIM-2. Remarkably, TIM-2 proved to be a receptor for H-ferritin, and it permits the endocytosis of H-ferritin. TIM-2 is also expressed in the liver and kidney. The laboratory is studying the effects of H-ferritin uptake on cell function.

Dr. Seaman is the Research Director of the American Asthma Foundation.